By Jessica Hamzelou Endometrial tissue (dark purple) inside an ovaryOGphoto/Getty ImagesOne in 10 women live with endometriosis, but we still don’t know its exact cause. New evidence suggests that some cases may be present from birth, and that different subtypes of the condition may benefit from different treatments. Endometriosis is diagnosed when endometrial cells from the lining of the uterus…


                        <figure class="article-image-inline" data-method="caption-shortcode"><img src="https://images.newscientist.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/08/ns-logo-for-featured-image.jpg?width=800" data-src="https://images.newscientist.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/12/27144411/gettyimages-532030092.jpg?width=300" data- class="image lazyload" alt="Endometrial tissue (dark purple) inside an ovary"><div class="image-details"><figcaption class="font-sans-serif-xxxs--bold">Endometrial tissue (dark purple) inside an ovary</figcaption><p class="credit font-sans-serif-xxxs--regular">OGphoto/Getty Images</p></div></figure>One in 10 women live with endometriosis, but we still don&rsquo;t&nbsp;know its exact cause. New&nbsp;evidence suggests that some&nbsp;cases may be present from birth, and that different subtypes of the condition may benefit from&nbsp;different treatments.

Endometriosis is diagnosed when endometrial cells from the lining of the uterus are found elsewhere in the body. When people with the condition menstruate, these patches of cells, wherever they are, bleed.

This is thought to be at least partly responsible for the debilitating pain people with endometriosis often experience, although we …

Source Link

Categories: Science

Leave a Reply

Leave a Reply

  Subscribe  
Notify of