By Michael Brooks LIGO’s detectors, including this one in Livingston, Louisiana, must separate gravitational wave signals from natural seismic vibrationsCaltech/MIT/LIGO LabThe Nobel prizewinning LIGO collaboration has published a paper describing in more detail than ever before how it analyses gravitational wave signals, partly in response to an investigation by New Scientist. But some physicists still say…


                        <figure class="article-image-inline" data-method="caption-shortcode"><img src="https://images.newscientist.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/08/ns-logo-for-featured-image.jpg?width=1200" data-src="https://images.newscientist.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/09/10172754/ligo-livingston-aerial-02.jpg?width=1200" data- class="image lazyload size-full wp-image-2216073" alt="Aerial view of LIGO's Livingston detector" data-credit="Caltech/MIT/LIGO Lab" data-caption="Goes here"><div class="image-details"><figcaption class="font-sans-serif-xxxs--bold">LIGO&rsquo;s detectors, including this one in Livingston, Louisiana, must separate gravitational wave signals from natural seismic vibrations</figcaption><p class="credit font-sans-serif-xxxs--regular">Caltech/MIT/LIGO Lab</p></div></figure>The Nobel prizewinning LIGO collaboration has published a paper describing in more detail than ever before how it analyses gravitational wave signals, partly in response to an investigation by&nbsp;<em>New Scientist</em>. But some physicists still say LIGO&rsquo;s work contains errors.

Almost no one doubts that gravitational waves exist. They are a prediction of general relativity, a highly successful physics theory. When the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory (LIGO) first announced it had detected one in 2016 it was cause for celebration …

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